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Diplomatic illness The practice of faking illness to avoid participating in a diplomatic event of one type or another while avoiding formal insults. “Diplomatic deafness” is a somewhat related concept in which older diplomats claim to take advantage of these infirmities by not hearing what they prefer not to hear. Diplomatic immunity Release of foreign diplomatic agents or representatives of local jurisdiction. See also Diplomatic immunity. Diplomatic Agent An umbrella term for a person who maintains regular diplomatic relations with the nation he or she represents in the nation for which he or she has been accredited. Diplomatic recognition is an important factor in determining whether a nation is an independent state. Recognition is often difficult, even for totally sovereign countries. Many decades after its independence, many of the Dutch Republic`s closest allies even refused to grant it full recognition. [Citation required] Today, there are a number of independent units without broad diplomatic recognition, especially the Republic of China (ROC)/Taiwan on the island of Taiwan. Since the 1970s, most nations have stopped officially recognizing the ROC at the request of the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The United States and most other nations maintain informal relations through de facto messages with names such as the American Institute in Taiwan.

Similarly, Taiwan`s de facto embassies abroad are known by names such as the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office. This was not always the case, as the US maintained formal diplomatic relations with the ROC and recognized them as the only legitimate government of “all of China” until 1979, when these relations were severed as a precondition for establishing official relations with the PRC. Extraterritoriality The exercise of certain sovereign functions in the territory of another State by a nation under formally concluded agreements. A limitation of the competence of the latter State in certain areas and/or on certain specific points. When European power spread throughout the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, its diplomatic model spread and Asian countries adopted syncric or European diplomatic systems. Thus, as part of diplomatic negotiations with the West on the control of the country and trade in China in the 19th century after the First Opium War representatives of Italy, England, the United States and France intimate portraits of themselves. [8] The ancient Greek city-states on a few occasions sent envoys to negotiate certain subjects such as war and peace or trade relations, but did not have diplomatic representatives regularly sent to the territory of the other. . . .